Untitled

illuminatizeitgeist:

“Observe constantly that all things take place by change, and accustom thyself to consider that the nature of the Universe loves nothing so much as to change the things which are, and to make new things like them.”

—  Marcus Aurelius

unicolourtoads:

Hammerhead and hammers head. Tooth and nail.

unicolourtoads:

Hammerhead and hammers head. Tooth and nail.

(via scientificillustration)

(Source: beautyandjunkie, via blaqmercury)

zashary:

All sizes | Chikanobu - Mirror of the Ages 1 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
typeworship:

This has already done the rounds, but I’m mesmerised by this brush so had to post: “All you down strokes are thick, all you up strokes are thin…snap to the right, up thin.”

Typeverything.com
Roundhand Lettering Demo by Glen Weisge.

typeworship:

This has already done the rounds, but I’m mesmerised by this brush so had to post: “All you down strokes are thick, all you up strokes are thin…snap to the right, up thin.”

Typeverything.com

Roundhand Lettering Demo by Glen Weisge.

(Source: typeverything, via blaqmercury)

tumuseum:

Sword Carolingian type branded master - “Ulfberht”, IX - X centuries., Vikings, Western Europe.

Blade length - 100 cm,
Blade width - 6.5 cm

(via blaqmercury)

mylittleillumination:

cosmic-rebirth:

Kuji-In Meditation

Ku-ji simply means “nine syllables”, and refers to a variety of mantras that consist of nine syllables. The syllables used in kuji are numerous, especially within the realm of mikkyo (Japanese esoteric Buddhism). The kuji most often referred to is of Taoist origin, not Buddhist. There is no record of the kuji in any of the Shingon or Tendai records that were brought back from China. The use of kuji is largely a layman’s practice, and not seen in the orthodox Buddhist traditions. It is found extensively in Shugendō, the ascetic mountain tradition of Japan, and ryobu Shinto which is the result of blending Buddhist, and Shinto beliefs.
The kuji are first introduced in the Taoist text Baopuzi (抱朴子) a poem written by Ge Hong c.280-340 ADE. In it he introduces the kuji in chapter 17 titled DengShe/ 登涉 (Climbing [mountains] and crossing rivers) as a prayer to the six Jia (generals of yang), ancient Taoist gods. in Daoist Magic, the Chia Spirit Generals are powerful celestial guardians and part of Tammon-Ten’s (Vaiśravaṇa), The God of the North, Celestial Thunder Court.
— https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuji-in

mylittleillumination:

cosmic-rebirth:

Kuji-In Meditation

Ku-ji simply means “nine syllables”, and refers to a variety of mantras that consist of nine syllables. The syllables used in kuji are numerous, especially within the realm of mikkyo (Japanese esoteric Buddhism). The kuji most often referred to is of Taoist origin, not Buddhist. There is no record of the kuji in any of the Shingon or Tendai records that were brought back from China. The use of kuji is largely a layman’s practice, and not seen in the orthodox Buddhist traditions. It is found extensively in Shugendō, the ascetic mountain tradition of Japan, and ryobu Shinto which is the result of blending Buddhist, and Shinto beliefs.

The kuji are first introduced in the Taoist text Baopuzi (抱朴子) a poem written by Ge Hong c.280-340 ADE. In it he introduces the kuji in chapter 17 titled DengShe/ 登涉 (Climbing [mountains] and crossing rivers) as a prayer to the six Jia (generals of yang), ancient Taoist gods. in Daoist Magic, the Chia Spirit Generals are powerful celestial guardians and part of Tammon-Ten’s (Vaiśravaṇa), The God of the North, Celestial Thunder Court.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuji-in

(via blaqmercury)

theusb:

Spacial Densities.

theusb:

Spacial Densities.

(via blaqmercury)

mucholderthen:

El Misterio del Mar  ||  Mystery of the Sea
Poster Set produced by Emilio Amade and Carlos Martínez
For “El Mundo”, sección Magazine.  [2007]

SOURCE: Carlos Martínez blog

(via scientificillustration)